Tortious Offense with Intentional Interference with Property

Tortious Offense with Intentional Interference with Property

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Tortious Offense with Intentional Interference with Property
The Tortious offense of Intentional Interference with Property is divided amongst three specific charges in the United States' tort law. All three charges involve the element of intent, which provides that the defendant is of sound mind and acts of his or her own free will and desire. As the charges of Intentional Interference with Property are tort and not criminal charges, the necessity of wrongful intent is not present.  The burden of proof lies solely on the prosecution's ability to prove intent. The charges of Intentional interference with property include trespass to land, trespass to chattels, and the charge of conversion.


Trespass to Land:


Conversion is a tort of strict liability which consists of an intentional act that violates the property ownership and associated rights of another. Conversion is considered a more serious charge than Trespass to Land or Trespass to Chattels. The main difference between the aforementioned property interferences and the interference of conversion is the clear necessity of misuse. One's property must be deliberately misused by the defender in order to qualify as conversion.


Trespass to Chattels:


The property tort of Trespass to Land consists of any unauthorized entry onto private property.  The key point in tort litigation of Trespass to Land is the definition of unauthorized. Authorized entry onto land comes in the form of a license, either written or implied. Implied licenses to enter land include uses of public access to land such as sidewalks or front doors. Other licenses include written permission or work order to conduct business on the property as commissioned or approved by the owner.  It is important to note, however, that licensees may still be charged with trespass if they violate the terms of their license or operate outside its terms. 
Conversion:
Conversion is a tort of strict liability which consists of an intentional act that violates the property ownership and associated rights of another. Conversion is considered a more serious charge than Trespass to Land or Trespass to Chattels. The main difference between the aforementioned property interferences and the interference of conversion is the clear necessity of misuse. One's property must be deliberately misused by the defender in order to qualify as conversion.

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